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Jews For The Preservation of Firearms Ownership, Inc.
P.O. Box 270143
Hartford, WI 53027

Phone (262) 673-9745
Fax (262) 673-9746


The State vs. The People:
What Every Thinking American Must Know

By Richard W. Stevens

“Every thinking person needs to read this book and confront its message – our civilization quite literally depends upon it.”

That is how I feel about Claire Wolfe and Aaron Zelman’s new book, The State vs. The People: The Rise of the American Police State.

But many people, even firearms owners and liberty activists, misunderstand the term “police state.” They mistakenly think that “police state” is an anti-police or anti-military slogan. Unfortunately, many American liberty activists also use the term without knowing what it really means.

When law officers and civilian liberty activists agree on a clear definition of “police state,” the two groups can unite to achieve the same goal: preserving a peaceful free society.


What is a “police state”?

A “police state” exists where:

In other words: the government is the boss with the plan, the people fear and therefore serve the government, and the police apparatus actively makes sure things stay that way.

The police and the military are not necessarily police state agents. Law officers, whose mission is to stop crime and track down violent criminals and thieves, are peace officers. Military members who deter or fight foreign invaders and attackers are forces for peace. Both categories of public servants work to preserve a free society by opposing the forces that would damage or destroy freedom.

Can it happen here?

How can we detect whether America is moving toward becoming a police state? This new book, The State vs. The People, discloses some of the key signs, such as:

The State vs. The People delivers the documented evidence that shows how America is lurching dangerously in the wrong direction: An ever-growing federal government bureaucracy, political correctness run amok, government schools teaching socialism better than they teach the “3 Rs.” Nearly any federal regulation that claims to be “for the children” or “to protect the public” can sail through Congress without a hiccup.

Destroying private firearms ownership is a key part of this trend. Every gun owner knows how increasingly difficult, costly and risky it is to exercise the right to keep and bear arms.

Law officers nationwide are seeing their jobs becoming increasingly nationalized, as local departments accept federal funding, equipment and controls. Federal agents are armed and looking for citizens to prosecute for regulatory violations and paperwork felonies. These are all features of every police state.

There are nearly 60,000 armed federal agents, with some 24 federal agencies now having expanded law enforcement powers, including long-term deputization to carry firearms. Many agencies – including the National Park Service – have their own SWAT teams.

Federal government employees now conduct airport security. Surely local police agencies could search air passengers and luggage when necessary, but the cry for “public safety” has shut down any criticism of the federal power expansion.

Like no other book I know, The State vs. The People powerfully describes how police states arise and function, and chillingly warns Americans about the modern police state policies at work in our beloved land. The “war on terrorism” is blunting the people’s ability to see the difference between legitimate police activity and the federal power ratchet, so every American must read this book and learn what to do.

Honored as the Freedom Book of the Month by Free-Market.Net for February 2002.

Get this book today for only $19.95 postage paid. Call (800) 869-1884 or click on www.jpfo.org. Orders are shipped fast – with every book you get three Gran’pa Jack booklets free.

You can defend the good only when you understand the evil. Read The State vs. The People ... and send copies to people who care about the blessings of liberty!

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