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NAACP releases report accusing tea
party groups of links to bigots

Reproduction of original article from
( Reference, JPFO alert of October 21st 2010. )



Posted on Tue, Oct. 19, 2010 10:41 PM

NAACP releases report accusing tea party groups of links to bigots
The Kansas City Star

Three months ago in Kansas City, the NAACP first raised charges of racism within the tea party movement. Today a report is being released accusing tea party groups of providing platforms to anti-Semites and other bigots.

“These groups and individuals are out there, and we ignore them at our own peril,” said NAACP President Benjamin Todd Jealous in a statement announcing the report. “They are speaking at tea party events, recruiting at rallies, and in some cases remain in the tea party leadership itself.”

The 94-page report is being released by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in a teleconference today.

In July, NAACP delegates passed a resolution at their national convention in Kansas City condemning racism within the tea party movement, creating a national furor. The NAACP board of directors ratified the resolution last week.

Tea party leaders condemned the report on Tuesday.

“Here we go again,” said Judson Phillips, founder of Tea Party Nation. “This is typical of this liberal group’s smear tactics.”

A Kansas City Star article in July found ties between several racist groups and tea parties, but tea party leaders said such incidents were not widespread.

The new report describes what it calls links between tea party factions and white supremacist groups, anti-immigrant organizations and militias, according to a news release issued by the Institute for Research and Education on Human Rights, which wrote the document.

Not only have tea parties given platforms to extremists, the news release said, the movement is a recruiting ground for hard-core white nationalists who are “hoping to push these (white) protesters toward a more self-conscious and ideological white supremacy.”

The report, “Tea Party Nationalism: A Critical Examination of the Tea Party Movement and the Size, Scope, and Focus of Its National Factions,” was written by Leonard Zeskind and Devin Burghart of the Kansas City-based Institute for Research and Education on Human Rights.

Zeskind and Burghart examined government documents and databases, including court cases, campaign finance reports and corporate filings.

“This is the first data-driven report of this type on the tea parties,” Burghart said. “Understanding their membership structures was the crucial first step that enabled us to understand the complexity of the tea party movement and to be able to specify the role of racists and bigots in the movement.”

The report cites numerous examples of what it said were racism and extremism within the tea party movement. Some of them, according to the news releases:

♦ The St. Louis-based Council of Conservative Citizens, the largest white nationalist group in the country, has both led and promoted tea party protests. Roan Garcia-Quintana, a member of ResistNet who served as media spokesman for a 2010 Tax Day Tea Party in South Carolina, is on the national board of directors for the Council of Conservative Citizens.

♦ The Wood County Tea Party in Texas is led by a woman who used to be involved with the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan.

♦ The 1776 Tea Party — also known as — is led by Stephen Eichler, executive director of the Minuteman Project, an anti-immigrant border patrol group often referred to as vigilantes.

Those tea parties could not be reached for comment Tuesday.

But Sal Russo, a California political consultant and chief strategist for the Tea Party Express, called the report ridiculous.

“To attack a grassroots movement of this magnitude with sundry isolated incidents only goes to show the NAACP has abandoned the cause of civil rights for the advancement of liberal Democrat politics,” Russo said.

“The Tea Party Express has publicly and explicitly repudiated racism.”

One political expert said he doubted the report would have much effect on the November elections.

“It’s a lot to digest,” said Burdett Loomis, political science professor at the University of Kansas. “Unless there’s something super dramatic in it, I just don’t see people’s minds being changed very much now.”


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